Medical Negligence Compensation Claims

Ophthalmic Negligence Claims – Cataracts / Retinal Detachment

Ophthalmology is the branch of medicine which deals with the anatomy, physiology and diseases of the eye.  The term ophthalmologist refers to a specialist in medical and surgical eye problems. Since ophthalmologists perform operations on eyes, they are considered to be both surgical and medical specialists.

If you have suffered as a result of late diagnosis, late referral or negligent treatment, a specialist medical negligence solicitor can help you to pursue a claim for compensation.

Clinical negligence cases involving Cararacts, FAQretinal detachment and Glaucoma tend to revolve around early detection and referral to specialists ophthalmologists. Early signs of these cases are often picked up by opticians during routine eye tests and patients are then referred to their GP and then on to an ophthalmologist. Early diagnosis and treatment are vital for the patient to have a chance of preserving their eyesight.

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Cataract Surgery

Cataracts are a very common cause of impairment of vision. Although often a degenerative disorder related to age, it does, however, have other causes including diabetes, direct injury to the posure to ultraviolet light from sunlight, long term steroid use, smoking, heavy drinking and poor diet.

Cataract surgery involves the lens of your eye being broken down into tiny pieces which are removed through a small cut in your eye. The lens is replaced with an artificial one.

Problems can occur because of flawed surgical technique during the surgery and insertion of the wrong type of lens due to incorrect pre-operative assessment.

If you have suffered as a result of negligent cataract surgery, contact a specialist medical negligence solicitor who will assess your claim.

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Retinal Detachment

The retina is the layer at the back of the eye which is covered in light-sensitive nerve endings (called rods and cones) and their connective tissue. It transmits images along the optic nerve to the brain. Detachment of the retina from the back of the eye causes loss of vision. Characteristically the vision loss appears to the patient as a shadow or dark curtain spreading across the field of vision. The degree of detachment dictates the amount of the loss of vision. Early signs of retinal detachment are flashing light, which ceases when the separation is complete.

A detached retina is a serious condition that can lead to blindness if it is not diagnosed and treated very quickly. It affects about one in 10,000 people.

Medical negligence cases involving retinal detachment tend to revolve around early detection and referral to specialists ophthalmologists. Early signs of retinal detachment are often picked up by opticians during routine eye tests and patients are then referred to their GP and then on to an ophthalmologist.

Early diagnosis can have a significant impact on whether sight can be restored or preserved, but failure to diagnose, or to treat retinal detachment, and failure or delay in referring to an appropriate specialist, or failure to find retinal breaks, could constitute medical negligence.

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Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a disease in which the optic nerve is damaged, leading to progressive, irreversible loss of vision. It is often, but not always, associated with increased pressure of the fluid in the eye.
Despite the fact that glaucoma can arise as a result of disease processes, poor clinical supervision of opticians or ophthalmologists can lead to delays in diagnosis of this serious condition which can, in turn, result in deterioration of vision and even blindness which can then lead to disability and, for example loss of earning capacity entitling victims to potential compensation.

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How much can I claim?

A number of factors will determine the value of your settlement:

What can I claim compensation for?

Making a claim for compensation

A specialist medical negligence solicitor can assess your case and inform you about: